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The Tale of the Golden Droppings

(Story found in:  Franklin Edgerton's reconstruction Durgasimha's Kannada translation Purnabhadra's recension Hitopadesha by Narayana )

There was a special bird named Sindhuka, who lived in a huge tree on the top of a mountain. When her droppings fell on the earth, they turned into gold.
One day, a hunter wandered to the top of the mountain. Not able to catch any bird, he decided to take some rest under the huge tree. From the top of the tree, the bird discharged its droppings, which fell near the hunter, and turned into gold. He was wonder-struck.
The hunter thought, "All these years I have been catching birds, but I have never heard of a bird's droppings turn into gold. This is a special bird, which I will have to catch!"
He set up a trap on the tree, which the bird did not notice and he was caught. The hunter, who was waiting nearby, immediately put him in a cage and started homewards. On the other hand, the bird repented that he was careless, not to notice the trap.
On his way, he thought, "If I keep this bird, I will become rich, and everyone will be suspicious. Someday, someone will come to know the truth of the riches, and the bird, and report it to the king. I rather present the bird to the king, and be content with whatever he offers me in return."
SO, he went straight to the palace and told the king everything. He gifted the bird to the king.
The king was delighted to have a bird whose droppings turned into gold, and asked his attendants to treat the bird as the royal bird, "Take proper care of this bird. Put him in a lavish cage, and give him plenty of food and water."
Suddenly, one of the king's ministers requested, "O King, How can a bird's droppings turn into gold? How can you trust this mere hunter who is not knowledgeable? I advise you to release the cage and let the bird go. As for the hunter, please punish him for forgery."
The king pondered over the words of his trusted and knowledgeable minister, and asked his guards to arrest the hunter and release the bird.
No sooner had the bird freed, it flew up and perched himself at the top of a nearby gate. He discharged his droppings, which to the amazement of the king and his ministers, turned into gold.
Realizing he had made a mistake, the king ordered his guards to catch the bird. But the bird was already free, he promised himself not to be careless again, and flew off where nobody can catch her again.
The wise indeed say:
Check thoroughly even what seems to be impossible.
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Tales Of Panchatantra